Recent Publications

. Migrating a monolithic application to microservices on Google Kubernetes Engine. Google Cloud website, 2019.

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. GitOps-style continuous delivery with Cloud Build. Google Cloud website, 2019.

Code Tutorial

. Best Practices for Operating Containers. Google Cloud website, 2018.

Solution Blog

. Best Practices for Building Containers. Google Cloud website, 2018.

Solution Blog

. Creating a Shared VPC with Deployment Manager. Google Cloud website, 2018.

Code Tutorial

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Google Cloud Platform (GCP) uses a specific resource hierarchy. At the very top, you have an organisation, tied to a domain (for example: mrtrustor.net). Inside that organisation, you can have folders and subfolders. Finally, you have projects, which can be inside folders, or directly under the organisation node. Projects are where your cloud resources (VMs, databases, etc.) actually live. By default, projects are completely isolated from one another, especially at a network level.

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Until now In my first post on this blog, I explained how I created this blog. At the time, I was using: Hugo as a static site generator, that is a tool that turns Markdown into a pretty static website. AWS S3 to host the website itself. Docker to run Hugo and generate the website from my Markdown files. Since then, I joined Google and using Amazon’s services to host my personal blog didn’t seem very “corporate” :-) So, I had updated my setup like this:

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Note: Since writing this post, I joined Google. We have released a feature called IP Aliases that addresses the problem described in this article, and much more. I recently ran into a problem while using Google Container Engine (GKE), the managed Kubernetes by Google. This lead me to an interesting solution that can be used for a large range of issues you could encounter in Kubernetes. The Problem I was unsuccessfully trying to have my pods communicate with an application available through a VPN: everything was working as expected from a VM but the pods in the GKE cluster had no network connectivity with the services on the other side of the VPN.

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This is the second and last part of my AWS re:Invent recap. Go check out the first part if you haven’t done so already. In this second post, I will outline the products announced by Werner Wogels during his keynote. You will also find a small opinionated analysis of the impact of each product, based on the current market and ecosystem. I tagged the really important ones with a [Game Changer] in the title.

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Two weeks ago, thanks to my company, Oxalide, I had the chance to attend AWS re:Invent, in Las Vegas. This is the first part of a recap of all the announcements (yes, there are so many things to talk about that it doesn’t fit in a single post). You will also find a small opinionated analysis of the impact of each product, based on the current market and ecosystem.

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